The Best Data Jobs in 2017

by   |   January 11, 2017 5:30 am   |   0 Comments

Bernard Marr

Bernard Marr

If you’re looking to make a career change in the new year, you could do a lot worse than to look for a job in data sciences. Last year, the website Glassdoor ranked data scientist as its No. 1 job on its list of the top 25 best jobs in America, and experts expect it to stay at the top of those sorts of lists for many years to come.

That’s because as more companies realize the value of their data and the business potential for using it, they need to hire people who can help them collect, analyze, store, and secure that data. A data scientist is only one of the types of jobs that help support this new sector of the IT industry, and all of these jobs promise high base salaries, strong growth opportunities, and great career prospects.

– Statistician

More of a mathematics-focused job than a tech one, these number crunchers are being hired for government, business, engineering, and healthcare projects to deal with the mass quantities of data now available in these fields, and they are in high demand. Base salaries are near $80,000 according to government data, and U.S. News and World Reports ranked it No. 3 in STEM jobs.

– Market Analyst

A market analyst examines the trends, collects the data, and formulates what services or products will be in demand to drive a company’s marketing strategy. Experts estimate that more than 100,000 analyst positions will open up in the next few years, making it a very hot job for 2017 and beyond.

– Information Security Analyst

Ranked No. 5 in Best Technology Jobs by U.S. News, demand for information security analysts is only going to grow as concerns about cybersecurity does. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts an 18 percent increase in information security jobs between 2014 and 2024. Median salary is nearly $89,000 a year.

– Database Administrator

Database administrators design and set up databases according to a company’s needs and then maintain and secure those databases The BLS is predicting good growth in this field as well, and with a median salary of $80,000, it’s also a lucrative field to get into.

– Analytics Manager

Analytics managers are crucial to companies that require a single point of contact to analyze and make conclusions about the data collected by the rest of the team. Similar to a data scientist, this person would have to have both an analytics background and a business background as well as managerial skills and experience — which explains why the median base salary starts at six figures.

– Data Scientist

Last year, data scientist was ranked the No. 1 job on Glassdoor’s 25 Best Jobs in America list, and for good reason. There’s still very high demand for data scientists, and they command high salaries as well as great opportunities for advancement. Base salary is around $116,000. As more and more companies begin to understand the value of the data they can collect, they need people who can help them manage, store, and analyze it to turn it into the valuable business asset it can be.

The entire field of data management and analytics is only going to get more exciting in 2017 and will offer an abundance of jobs and new career opportunities.

 

Bernard Marr is a bestselling author, keynote speaker, strategic performance consultant, and analytics, KPI, and big data guru. In addition, he is a member of the Data Informed Board of Advisers. He helps companies to better manage, measure, report, and analyze performance. His leading-edge work with major companies, organizations, and governments across the globe makes him an acclaimed and award-winning keynote speaker, researcher, consultant, and teacher.

 

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